Journal: Nigerian Journal of Applied Behavioural Sciences

Archive - Volume(1)

  • Author: Samuel E. Oladipo Volume: 1(1) 2013 Page: 1-10

    Perceived organizational climate and job motivation as predictors of teachers’ attitude to work

    Corresponding Author

    Samuel E. Oladipo

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    Allen, D. K. (2003). Organizational climate and strategic change in higher education: Organizational insecurity. Higher Education, 46(1), 6192 - 6209.

    Ayeni, A. J. (2005). The effect of principal’s leadership styles on motivation of teachers for job performance in secondary schools in Akure South Local Government. Unpublished Masters’ Thesis, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile Ife

    Bain, K. (2004). What the best college teachers do. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 

    Ball, D. B., & Lampert, M. (1999). Multiples of learning issues in education research: Problems and possibilities. New York: Jossey-Bass.

    Bedeian, A. G. (1993). Management (3rd edn.). New York: Dryden Press.

    Bhalla, A., Jajoo, U. N., & Kalantri, S. P. (2002). Attitude of teachers towards teaching. Journal of Association of India Physicians, 50, 1405 – 1408.

    Brown, J. S., & Richard, A. (2008). Minds on fire: Open education, the long tail, and learning. Educational Review. Retrieved on 30 July, 2013 from http://net.educause.edu/ir/library/pd f/ERM0811.pdf 

    Buford, J. A., Jr., Bedeian, A. G., & Lindner, J. R. (1995). Management in extension (3rd edn.). Columbus, Ohio: Ohio State University Extension. 

    Colquitt, J. A., Noe, R. A., & Jackson, C. L. (2002). Justice in teams: Antecedents and consequences of procedural justice climate. Personnel Psychology, 55, 83 – 109.

    Filak, B., & Sheldon, M. (2003) Student psychological need satisfaction and college teacher-course evaluations. Educational Psychology, 23, 235 - 247.

    Gonzalez-Roma, V., Peiro, J. M., & Tordera, N. (2002). An examination of the antecedents and moderator influences of climate strength. Journal of Applied Psychology, 87, 465 – 473.

    Kreitner, R. (1995). Management (6th edn.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company.

    Lindell, M. K., & Brandt, C. J. (2000). Climate quality and climate consensus as mediators of the relationship between organizational antecedents and outcomes. Journal of Applied Psychology, 85, 331 – 348.

    Maslow, A. H. (1943). A theory of human motivation. Psychological Review, 370 - 396.

    Payne, R. L., & Morrison, D. L. (2002). The differential effects of negative affectivity on measures of well-being versus job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Anxiety Stress and Coping, 15, 231 - 244.

    Peek, R. C. (2003). The relationship between organizational climate and job satisfaction as reported by institutional research staff at Florida community colleges. Unpublished PhD Dissertation, University of Florida.

    Richardson, V. (1999). Teacher education and the construction of meaning. In G. Griffin (Ed.), The education of teachers (pp.145 - 166). Chicago: The University of Chicago Press.

    Schneider, B., Macey, W. H., Barbera, K. M., & Martin, N. (2009). Driving customer satisfaction and financial success through employee engagement. People and Strategy, 32(2), 22 - 27.

    Scott, D., Sperling, R. S., McMullen T. D., & Bowbin, B. (2008). A study of pay communications: Methods for the improvement of employee understanding. World at Work Journal, 17(3), 6 - 20.

    Smith, G. P. (1994). Motivation. In W. Tracey (Ed.), Human resources management and development handbook (2nd edn.).

    Sturman, M. C., Cheramie, R. A., & Cashen, L. H. (2005). The impact of job complexity and performance measurement on the temporal consistency, stability and test-retest reliability of employee job performance rating. Journal of Applied Psychology, 90, 269 – 283.

    Tracey, W. (2000). Intrinsic motivation. Teachers Net Gazette, 1(6), 10 – 17.

    There is a vacuum in literature regarding how organizational climate and job motivation affect public secondary school teachers’ attitude to work. This study, therefore, examined organizational climate and job motivation as predictors of work attitude among 250, randomly selected public secondary school teachers in a SouthWestern State of Nigeria. The sample was made up of 129 males and 121 females. Results showed that perceived organizational climate had a significant positive relationship with teachers’ work attitude. However, job motivation was not significantly related with work attitude. The results of the regression analysis indicated that perceived organizational climate positively predicted teachers’ attitude to work. However, work motivation did not predict teacher’ attitude to work. Similarly, job motivation and organizational climate did not jointly predict teachers’ attitude to work. Conclusively, organizational climate and job motivation are important factors to be considered in influencing a positive attitude to work among public secondary school teachers. Therefore, efforts must be geared towards the provision of favourable organizational climate where no favoritism will be perceived and where outstanding achievements among teachers will be recognized and adequately rewarded. 

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    Corresponding Author

    Samuel E. Oladipo (PhD) Department of Counselling Psychology, College of Applied Education and Vocational Technology, Tai Solarin University of Education, PMB 2118 Ijagun, Ogun State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2348053480182.

    Keywords

    Organizational Climate Motivation Teachers Attitude
  • Author: Ademola B. Owolabi Volume: 1(1) 2013 Page: 11-20

    Influence of work locus of control and perceived environmental support on employees’ work attitude and organizationally beneficial behaviour

    Corresponding Author

    Ademola B. Owolabi

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    Britton, M. D. (1997). Perception of the work environment among correctional officers: Do race and sex matters? Criminology, 35, 85-105

    Cohen, A. (1992). Antecedent of organizational commitment across occupational groups: A metaanalysis. Journal of Orgainzational Behaviour, 13, 539-558. 

    Hogg, M., & Vaughan, G. (2005). Social psychology (4th edn.). Essex: Pearson Education Ltd.

    Hyatt, A. T., & Prawitt, F. D. (2001). Does congruence between audit structure and auditor's locus of control affect job performance? The Accounting Review, 76, 263-274.

    Judge, T. A., Thoresen, C. J., Bono, J. E. (2001). The job satisfaction-job performance relationship: A qualitative review. Psychological Bulletin, 127(3), 376 – 407

    Jurik, N. C. (1985). An officer and a lady: Organization barriers to women working as correctional officers in men's prison. Social Problems, 32, 375-388.

    Lam, K. S. S., & Schaubroeck, J. (2000). The role of locus of control in reaction to being promoted and to being passed over: A quasi experiment. The Academy of Management Journal, 13, 66-78. 

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    Rotter, J. B (1966). Generalized expectancies of internal versus external control of a variable. American Psychologist, 45, 489-493

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    Ryan, R. M., & Deci, E. L. (2000). Self-determination theory and the facilitation of intrinsic motivation, social development, and well-being. American Psychologist, 55, 68–78. 

    Schultz, D. P and Schultz, S. E. (2005). Theories of personality (8th edn.). Wadsworth: Thomson.

    Shute, G., Howard, M., & Steyaert, Y (1984). The relations among cognitive development, locus of control and gender. Journal of Research in Personality, 18, 335 – 341. 

    Spector, P. E. (1988). Development of the work locus of control scale. Journal of Occupational Psychology, 61, 335-340.

    raw, B. M. & Ross, J. (1985). Stability in the midst of change: A dispositional approach to job attitudes. Journal of Applied Psychology, 70, 69-80. 

    Udoh, C. O., & Ajala, J. A. (1986). The concept of mental and social health. Bodija, Ibadan: Claverianum Press.

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    Wiss, H. M. (2002). Deconstructing job satisfaction: separating evaluations, beliefs and affective experience. Human Resource Management Review, 12, 173-194.

    This study investigated the extent to which work locus of control and perceived environmental support influence employees work attitude and organizationally beneficial behaviour. A total of 181 employees (105 females; 76 males), selected from private and public sector organizations, participated in the study. Results indicated that employees who held internal locus of control had better work attitude than those who held external locus of control. Though perceived environmental support did not influence employees work attitude, results revealed that when employees perceived supportive work environment they tended to engage in organizationally beneficial behaviour, compared with when the work environment was perceived as less supportive. Finally, there were no sex and sectoral differences in employees work attitude, organizationally beneficial behaviour, perceived environmental support, and locus of control.

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    Corresponding Author

    Ademola B. Owolabi (PhD), Department of Psychology, Ekiti State University, AdoEkiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2348066708016.

    Keywords

    Locus Of Control Support Work Attitude
  • Author: Janet T. Kolade & Stella A. Olowodunoye Volume: 1(3) 2013 Page: 21-31

    Influence of marital stress on organizational commitment among teachers and police officers

    Corresponding Author

    Janet T. Kolade & Stella A. Olowodunoye

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    This study investigated the extent to which marital stress influence organizational commitment of teachers and police officers. Participants were 300 (149 teachers; 151 police officers). Their ages ranged between 33 and 55 years (M = 37.24; SD = 11.10). Results indicated that organizational commitment increased with employees’ length of service. Marital stress had no significant influence on organizational commitment; but occupational differences existed in organizational commitment with teachers being more committed than police officers. Furthermore, marital stress and type of occupation did not jointly influence organizational commitment. 

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    Corresponding Author

    Janet T. Kolade, Department of Pure &Applied Psychology, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 001 Akungba-Akoko, 34-234 Ondo State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2348069118568.

    Keywords

    Service Occupation Police Teacher Commitment
  • Author: Opeyemi I. Segun-Martins Volume: 1(4) 2013 Page: 32-42

    Influence of depression, perfectionism, and life-stress on suicidal ideation among youths

    Corresponding Author

    Opeyemi I. Segun-Martins

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    This study investigated the influence of depression, perfectionism and lifestress on suicidal ideation among youths. Using a cross-sectional survey, 283 youths (males = 127; females = 156) were randomly sampled. Their ages averaged 19.14 years (SD = 4.10). The results revealed that age, religion, and occupation were related with suicidal ideation among youths. Depression predicted suicidal ideation such that youths that were highly depressed tended to experience higher suicidal ideation compared with those who reported low level of depression. Perfectionism and life-stress were not related with suicidal ideation. However, depression, perfectionism and life-stress jointly predicted suicidal ideation among youths. In view of these findings, it was concluded that depressed youths, especially in the presence of perfectionistic tendency and stressful life events, are more at risk of suicidal ideation.

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    Opeyemi Segun-Martin, Department of Pure & Applied Psychology, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 001 Akungba-Akoko, 34-234 Ondo State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2347032316270.

    Keywords

    Depression Perfectionism Life-stress Suicidal Ideation Youths
  • Author: Anthony G. Balogun & Philomena A. Olawoye Volume: 1(5) 2013 Page: 43-55

    Correlates of depression among prison inmates in south-western nigeria

    Corresponding Author

    Anthony G. Balogun & Philomena A. Olawoye

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    Despite the prevalence of depression among prison inmates in Nigeria, there are limited studies on the correlates of depression among prison inmates in Nigeria. In view of this gap in knowledge, this study examined the influence of emotional intelligence and self-esteem on depression among prison inmates in two Southwestern states in Nigeria. A total of 233 (201 males; 32 females) participants were selected for the study. Their ages ranged between 21 to 69 years (M = 31.3; SD = 3.23). Results revealed that inmates who were high in emotional intelligence were significantly less depressed compared with those with low level of emotional intelligence. Similarly, inmates with high self-esteem were significantly less depressed compared with those who reported low self-esteem. Lastly, inmates with high emotional intelligence and self-esteem reported the lowest level of depression compared with other categories of inmates. The findings of this study implicated the need to include emotional intelligence training in Nigeria prison reformation and rehabilitation programmes. In addition to that, rehabilitation programmes should be designed to enhance the self-esteem of prison inmates.

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    Anthony G. Balogun, Department of Pure & Applied Psychology, Adekunle Ajasin University, P. M. B. 001 Akungba-Akoko, 34-234 Ondo State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2348032960406.

    Keywords

    Depression Emotional Intelligence Self-esteem Prison Inmates
  • Author: Adedeji J. Ogunleye, Femi R. Oluwajuyitan & Akindele M. Adetoye Volume: 1(6) 2013 Page: 56-67

    Influence of locus of control, religious affiliation, and religiosity on paranormal beliefs among young adults

    Corresponding Author

    Adedeji J. Ogunleye, Femi R. Oluwajuyitan & Akindele M. Adetoye

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    This study investigated the extent to which locus of control, religious affiliation, and religiosity affect paranormal beliefs among young adults. Participants were 261 (163 males; 98 females) young adults selected from a public polytechnic in Southwestern Nigeria. Their average age was 24.20 (SD = 9.48) with a range of 18-34 years. Results of the t test generally indicated that locus of control did not influence dimensions and overall paranormal beliefs, except belief in parapsychology and spiritualism. Paranormal beliefs of young adults had linked with religious affiliation. Generally, religiosity had no connection with dimensions and overall paranormal beliefs, except superstition. Results of the F test revealed that locus of control, religious affiliation, and religiosity had no significant interaction effects on paranormal beliefs. Finally, the results of the t test showed that sex and age category had no significant influence on paranormal beliefs, except parapsychology where age category exerted a significant influence. 

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    Adedeji J. Ogunleye (PhD), Department of Psychology, Ekiti State University, AdoEkiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2348036758644.

    Keywords

    Paranormal Religiosity Locus Of Control Young Adults
  • Author: Adepeju Ogungbamila Volume: 1(7) 2013 Page: 68-74

    Demographic predictors of premarital sexual behaviours among undergraduates

    Corresponding Author

    Adepeju Ogungbamila

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    Previous studies have implicated premarital sexual behaviours in abortions, teenage mothers, and sexually transmitted infections. Less research attention has focused the extent to which age and gender predict premarital sexual behaviours among undergraduates; a lacuna this study aimed to fill. A total of 198 undergraduates (104 males; 94 females) were sampled from a public university in southwestern Nigeria. Their age ranged from 15 to 39 years (M = 23.20 years; SD = 3.17). Results revealed that age and gender did not significantly predict premarital sexual behaviours. There was no gender difference in undergraduates’ premarital sexual behaviours. It was, therefore, concluded that premarital sexual behaviours cut across undergraduates irrespective of their age and gender. 

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    Adepeju Ogungbamila, Department of Pure & Applied Psychology, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 001 Akungba-Akoko 34-234 Ondo State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2348078888549.

    Keywords

    Premarital Behaviours University Student Undergraduate
  • Author: Olukayode A. Afolabi & Joan E. Obuseh Volume: 1(8) 2013 Page: 75-86

    Influence of locus of control, perceived selfefficacy and alcohol use on risky sexual decision making

    Corresponding Author

    Olukayode A. Afolabi & Joan E. Obuseh

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    The level of risks taken by youths concerning sexual behaviour is increasing everyday and there is dearth of information about the roles of locus of control, selfefficacy and alcohol use. This study thus, examined the influence of these variables on risky sexual decision making among undergraduates. One hundred and thirty undergraduates (67males; 63 females), selected from a public university in Southern Nigeria participated in the study. Results showed that locus of control and perceived self-efficacy exerted no independent but significant interaction effect on risky sexual decision making. Males tended to take higher risky sexual decision making than females. Alcohol use did not influence undergraduates’ risky sexual decision making. Finally, gender and alcohol use had a significant effect on undergraduates’ tendency to take risky sexual decisions. 

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    Olukayode A. Afolabi (PhD), Department of Pure &Applied Psychology, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 001 Akungba-Akoko, 34-234 Ondo State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2348034676352

    Keywords

    Locus Of Control Self-efficacy Alcohol Sexual Decision
  • Author: Stella A. Olowodunoye & Bunawari F. Ojogo Volume: 1(9) 2013 Page: 87-95

    Age, gender, and family relations as correlates of self-esteem among physically and non-physically challenged secondary school students

    Corresponding Author

    Stella A. Olowodunoye & Bunawari F. Ojogo

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    The study investigated the extent to which age, gender and family relations predicted self-esteem of the physically and non-physically challenged. Participants were 232 students (116 physically challenged; 116 non-physically challenged) whose ages averaged 17.16 years. Results indicated that physically challenged had lower self-esteem than non-physically challenged students. Age was associated with lower self-esteem. But good family relations enhanced students’ self-esteem. Lastly, age, gender and family relations exerted a significant joint influence on self-esteem. 

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    Stella A. Olowodunoye, Department of Pure &Applied Psychology, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 001 Akungba-Akoko, 34-234 Ondo State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2348059227041.

    Keywords

    : Self-esteem Gender Physically Challenged Family Relations.
  • Author: R. Santos Alimi Volume: 1(10) 2013 Page: 96-104

    An analysis of meat demand in akungba-akoko, nigeria

    Corresponding Author

    R. Santos Alimi

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    This study examined households’ preference for and meat consumption patterns. Participants were 300 heads of household (141 males; 159 females) whose ages ranged between 18 to 65 years (M = 43.20; SD = 10.11). Results indicated that beef (60.14%) was the most preferred meat, followed by chicken (29.72%) and turkey (26.92%). The proportion of household’s total expenditure on meat was high for low income households (18%), compared with middle or high income households. The percentage of household food expenditure expended on meat was high for both low income households and high income households, compared middle income households. The most important factor considered by households while purchasing meat was the taste and habits, followed by nutritional value and prices. Other factors observed were freshness, tenderness and religious sentiments. Hence, in livestock farming the various determinants such as preferences, choices, sentiments that may influence the choices of meat consumers’ should be considered. 

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    R. Santos Alimi, Department of Economics, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 001 Akungba-Akoko, 34-234 Ondo State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected], [email protected] Phone: +2348102304980.

    Keywords

    Expenditure Pattern Meat Consumption Households
  • Author: Uchenna, C. Onuoha Volume: 1(11) 2013 Page: 105-114

    Counterproductive work behavior among employees in emotionally demanding jobs: the roles of perceived organizational support, job burnout, and age

    Corresponding Author

    Uchenna, C. Onuoha

    [email protected]
  • ABSTRACT

    Interest in counterproductive work behavior (CWB) is growing in recent time because of the problems it creates for firms. The present study extended previous research on CWB by investigating the influence of perceived organizational support and job burnout on CWB among employees in emotionally demanding jobs. The study was a cross-sectional survey, in which a sample of 328 employees in organizations that render highly personalized service participated. The results of the multiple regression analysis showed that employees with favorable perception of organizational support were less likely to exhibit CWB. Employees who reported job burnout showed higher tendency of engaging in CWB than those who did not report job burnout. However, age did not influence employees’ tendency to engage in CWB. Employee assisted programs such as flexible working hours and cognitive re-training of employees to manage their expectations were recommended. 

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    Uchenna C. Onuoha, Department of Pure & Applied Psychology, Adekunle Ajasin University, PMB 001 Akungba-Akoko, 34-234 Ondo State, Nigeria. E-mail: [email protected] Phone: +2348034544547.

    Keywords

    Counterproductive Work Behavior Support Burnout Emotional Demand